103, 2017

Consumer Affairs Vic – Builder Update

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From 1 September 2016, Victorian builders must give a copy of the new Domestic Building Consumer Guide to their clients, before the client signs a major domestic building contract. The Domestic Building Consumer Guide is the contract information statement required by section 29A of the Domestic Building Contracts Act 1995. Most of the information referred to in the guide can be found via our Domestic Building Consumer Guide page. You can also download the Domestic Building Consumer Guide (Word, 108KB). To complement the new guide, we have updated the checklist that must be included in a major domestic building contract.

2502, 2017

Causes of Failure in Waterproofing: Substrate Moisture

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The third major cause of waterproofing failures is residual moisture in the substrate causing adhesive failure or de-bonding of the membrane. Australian Standards for textile floor coverings (AS/NZS 2455.1), vinyl flooring (AS 1884), tiling (AS 3958.1),painting (AS 2311), plywood (AS/NZS 2269) and timber (AS/NZS 1080.1, AS 2792.2) all specify the substrate dryness or material moisture content for the installation of various floor covering materials over concrete and mortar screeds. Why Australian Standards for waterproofing (AS 3740 / AS 4654.1) has failed to define and specify methods for determining the substrate dryness or moisture content has remained a perplexing issue. There [...]

1901, 2017

Causes of Failure in Waterproofing: Priming

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The second most common recurring problem, after poor surface preparation, is the failure to prime the respective parts and surfaces before the application of the waterproofing membrane. Failure of the waterproofing membrane bond to substrates is a recurring and consistent problem often associated with poor subsurface drainage and saturation of tiling or topping screeds. Every manufacturer of a sealant or a waterproofing membrane specifies priming of surfaces. There are primers available for a large range of materials to enhance adhesive bond strength of both sealants and membranes. Most membranes currently on the market will not form a chemical waterproof bond [...]

811, 2016

Notes from a Balcony Inspection

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The property was inspected by Mr P. Evans, Registered Builder, Trade Qualified, Certified Waterproofer, Vice President of The Australian Institute of Waterproofing, Cert 111 OH & S, 40 yrs in Construction. Here are his notes, which are a great read for anyone in the constructon industry: Upon inspecting the balcony without performing invasive testing ( lifting tiles) an audio test on random tiles confirmed the tiles are de-bonding in a large majority of the balcony area consisting of approx 70M2. These tiles are know in the industry as "drummy" due to the hollow sound made when impacted with a firm [...]

811, 2016

Making the Most of the AIW Logo

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If you are a member of the Australian Institute of Waterproofing, you are entitled to a number of benefits. These include access to technical information and drawings, trainings and additional exposure through our waterproofing directory. However one of the biggest advantages of being an AIW member is often overlooked. That advantage is the rights to use our logo on your website and on other forms of communication. As the official representative body for the waterproofing industry, our brand is highly recognisable and trusted. Aligning your company with the AIW will enhance your own credibility, professionalism and industry recognition. An AIW [...]

1410, 2016

Getting It Right in the First Place

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The construction industry has mostly been driven by the $$$ cost of having a product/service or both installed. As building demands become higher and higher for multi unit dwellings we have seen an enormous trend to short cut many of the building process in order to get in and out quicker and turn over the job so it can be sold or rented out. While the dollar is God in most cases, this drive is causing an enormous backlash for owners and insurance companies in rectifying waterproofing issues. Common causes of waterproofing failure are: the design in the first place, [...]

509, 2016

The History of Waterproofing

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Ever wonder how long waterproofing has been around? Amazingly, it has been part of human dwelling construction for over 13,000 years, viewed by a number of people as the third oldest trade, behind only carpentry and masonry. It came about from the desire to protect our shelters from the elements, and not surprisingly, has seen vast improvements over the ages. The agrarian revolution saw a decrease in small hunter-gatherers groups as many formed larger social units and "stayed put" in more permanent locations. This resulted in a more productive form of agriculture and excess grain from the harvests needed to [...]

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